Cash-strapped Lebanon wakes up to countrywide roadblocks

Protesters across Beirut, Tripoli, Saida, and other cities closed highways and intersections on Monday morning with their vehicles, and put tyres and rubbish dumpsters on fire.

They called on the government to control the plunging Lebanese pound, which for the past week has hovered at about 25,000 to the US dollar. The pound has lost about 90 percent of its value in about two years.

Prime Minister Najib Mikati’s government remains gridlocked and has not convened in almost two months, unable to resolve a diplomatic dispute with Saudi Arabia and several Gulf countries and settle differences over Beirut blast investigator Judge Tarek Bitar.

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Milaperetz

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Giving you access to untold stories, facts, and expert sources on all things about Middle East

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